Impressions of an Introvert in Hanfu

Xi’an in spring offers the opportunity to take your cultural experience and moment-capturing photography to the next level by introducing the unique element of history this city offers in abundance with the accompaniment of cherry blossoms and spring flowers in bloom. To take advantage of this backdrop, you may have seen locals walking around in traditional-style clothing in search of the perfect background to match the patterns and colours of the historically cultural fashion statement called “Hanfu”.

Xi’an Spring Eating Guide: The Herbs of Spring in Xi’an

For many locals in Xi’an, spring means eating the bounty of fresh herbs that grow for a short period during the spring. There is a saying that a spring without herbs is a soulless one. During springtime, you will most likely find many locals heading to the mountains and fields to dig up wild herbs with shovels in hands and sunhats on head, as the potherb is the soul of theirs and this is the way they greet Spring.

Since ancient time there has been a wording 咬春 Yao Chun or Bite Spring, it is the season for potherbs in March and April switching from the heavy meats and fish of the Spring Festival holiday to lighter and more fresh tastes. So, tune into the season and get a mouthful of Spring.

WINTER SPORTS IN XI’AN Mostly Shredding Expectations, Not Snow

The groans and hisses of radiators, the prevalence of puffy jackets, and falling of the last few stubborn orange and yellow leaves herald the gradual but certain arrival of winter. We even had our first snowfall of the season on November 22! However, fanatics here often face a difficult question: “How do I do (insert winter sport name) in Xi’an???”

Ancient Chinese Ghost Stories

南阳宋定伯,年少时,夜行逢鬼。问曰:“谁?”鬼曰:“鬼也”鬼日:“卿复谁?定伯欺之,言:我亦鬼也。”鬼问:“欲至何所?”答日:“欲至宛市。”鬼言:我亦欲至宛市。”共行数里。鬼言:“步行大亟,可共迭相担也。”定伯日:“大善。”鬼便先担定伯数里。鬼言:“卿大重,将非鬼也?”定伯言:“我新死,故重耳。”

The Elusive Gui of China

The monsters of Chinese folklore haunt the underworld Dì Yù 地狱, the backyard during the rainy season, and everywhere in between— including your stomach. Here in China, ghosts and goblins in fables fuse the bizarre into scenes of normalcy. Ancient fables often show the beasts as the “other”, exposing the shortcomings and paradoxes of human nature. The monsters cross the bounds of living and dead, intruding and upsetting the lives of humans.